2018 hybrid Willow SRC harvest

A dry day (at last) allowed a late afternoon walk through a row of hybrid willow short rotation coppice (SRC) to hand cut poles of 7cm dia or more for processing into wood chunks to be used as fuel in BBQ’s, wood fired Pizza Ovens, Wood boilers wood burners.

Hand cutting hybrid SRC willow for wood fuel
Hand cutting hybrid SRC willow for wood fuel

Whilst a mechanical harvest is much faster, it would clear all stems and thus be much more disruptive to the habitat. Hand cutting allows only those poles which have achieved the optimum size to be cut leaving the rest for future years.

The hybrid willow SRC 'stools'
The hybrid willow SRC ‘stools’

It might be some time before we can get on to the ground with a trailer to collect the harvest but at least this row has been cut through.

Lengths of hand cut Willow Short Rotation Coppice (SRC)
Lengths of hand cut Willow Short Rotation Coppice (SRC)

A few sticks were brought back to the yard for processing into wood chunks. Once dried, the willow wood chunks makes a first first class fuel for wood ovens and also as a great alternative to lumpwood charcoal on BBQ’s (just light it 15 minutes earlier than you would with charcoal).

Willow sticks loaded into the back of the car
Willow sticks loaded into the back of the car

The chunker is powered by a tractor and makes short work of all the sticks fed into it. The wood chunks are then air dried in plastic trays for a year.

Our 'Chunker' powered by a 1971 MF 135
Our ‘Chunker’ powered by a 1971 MF 135

The chunker will process seasoned sticks but it is much kinder to feed it freshly cut sticks as it is far easier for it to processes them and it makes less splinters whilst doing so.

The 'Chunker' output: Willow wood chunks
The ‘Chunker’ output: Willow wood chunks

Once in plastic trays, the wood chunks are stacked up on a pallet and air dried for at least one year before they are ready for use.

Wet willow wood chunks stacked ready for seasoning
Wet willow wood chunks stacked ready for seasoning

 

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Growing Firewood – 2018 Update

The latest annual update in our trial of a number of species planted specifically for firewood. All species are on the same soil type so whilst not particularly scientific the findings are sufficient to judge which performs best for us.

Storming ahead in both rate of growth and quality of logs is the Eucalyptus Omeo. A very hardy variety which has incredible growth leaving everything else well behind. It is incredible to think this was a tiny seed in a packet four years ago.

Growing firewood 2018 update - Eucalyptus Omeo
Growing firewood 2018 update – Eucalyptus Omeo year 4

The Eucalyptus Gunnii is not far behind. Gunnii is a popular UK garden tree, not as hardy as the Omeo but easily and cheaply sourced.

Growing firewood 2018 update - Eucalyptus Gunnii year 4
Growing firewood 2018 update – Eucalyptus Gunnii year 4

The hybrid willow would be next in rate of growth. This would be commercially harvested every 3 years as chip for biomass boilers but we wanted to see, if left, would it make decent logs. What we have found is that as the regrowth gets bigger, the stool struggles to support the weight and splits. For more detail please see the August update on the 2017 post

Growing firewood 2018 update - Hybrid willow year 4
Growing firewood 2018 update – Hybrid willow year 4

The same hybrid willow in its third year is perfect for making wood chunks and so it is likely that this will be the optimum time to harvest. Willow wood chunks really do make a for good biomass when dry. Fantastic for use in log boilers, good for the first load in a wood burner and the perfect fuel for pizza ovens where the gases flare off quickly and leave a wall of very hot charcoal that can be moved around easily.

Growing firewood 2018 update - Hybrid willow year 3
Growing firewood 2018 update – Hybrid willow year 3

We have some older Alder plants that we grew from seed but to keep up with demand for our Alder wood chunks (used primarily by local Polish and Latvian migrants for smoking meats and cheeses) we planted an acre of Alder in spring 2014 as 40cm bare rooted saplings.

Alder four years on from planting
Alder four years on from planting

Lastly and for reference the sycamore which was planted out from pots in the same year that the Eucalyptus seed arrived is doing will but just shows how far behind it is in terms of growth rate.

Growing firewood 2018 update - Sycamore year 4
Growing firewood 2018 update – Sycamore year 4

Links to the previous updates are:
2017 update
2016 update

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Cold Day At The Office

I was out and about before the inevitable traffic chaos that goes hand in hand with a dusting of snow and glad I did so judging by the traffic later on.

First stop was feeding the hens, the goose, his pheasant lady friends and two robins who stopped fighting for a few minutes so they could feed on a bit of barley.

Our gander doesn't look that impressed with the snow
Our gander doesn’t look that impressed with the snow

The ‘Office’ looked nice but it was a bit chilly for processing firewood. We had a bit of a rush on yesterday when the snow was forecast but managed to keep everyone happy.

The wood yard
The wood yard this morning

We don’t do firewood deliveries and today would really not be the day to start but we have the kit and could do it the hard way at a price!

Delivering logs in the snow
Delivering logs in the snow

 

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Harvesting Hazel sticks

A nice frosty morning allowed a quick venture into our hazel coppice to select and cut some sticks for our stock of blank walking stick shanks catering for local stick makers.

Harvesting Hazel sticks
Harvesting Hazel sticks

In the main they only get offered for sale after being seasoned for at least twelve months (necessary for the stick straightening process to be effective) but some of our more eager customers do like a browse through the freshly cut stock as well.

Hazel walking stick shanks harvested January 2018
Hazel walking stick shanks harvested January 2018

More details: www.woodlandcraftshop.co.uk/walking-sticks.html

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Tree Planting Season Begins

Last year it was 5000 trees on 11 acres at Banks and this year the plan is for some 2500 trees to be planted on a field off Becconsall Lane in Hesketh Bank. The saplings were delivered this morning so now it is race against time to get the bare rooted plants into the ground before they dry out.

Planting trees in Hesketh Bank
Planting trees in Hesketh Bank

As the ground is still very very wet, the trees, stakes and guards have all been moved onto site with the low ground pressure trailer and a compact tractor.

Ready to go - tree planting 2017Ready to go – tree planting 2017

As we passed the recently restored ‘bomb hole’ pond, two Snipe got up from the rushes on the pond edge . I have not seen snipe in these fields for the twenty two years we have been here so that was noteworthy.

Preparing for tree planting
Preparing for tree planting

Distributing the stakes and tree guards around the plot without doing damage is very difficult when it is so wet. Our small compact tractor with grass tyres was again used but this time with some pallet forks fitted rather than a trailer. To minimise the impact the front weights were removed which meant additional trips but really did minimise the ruts left. After the next (seemingly inevitable) downpour there was little evidence left of a tractor being on the field.

Winter 2017/18 Tree planting at Becconsall Lane, Hesketh Bank
Winter 2017/18 Tree planting at Becconsall Lane, Hesketh Bank

It will be 10-15 years before this new coppice plantation will become productive so it is not a short term project.  It will eventually provide a source of timber for traditional woodland crafts, wood chunks for flavoured smoke for food smokers and BBQ’s (WoodChunks.co.uk), fuel for wood fired pizza ovens and firewood (CarbonNeutralFuel.co.uk) but, in the mean time, the growing trees will store carbon, will provide a home for wildlife, absorb air pollution, help reduce water flow/flood risk into the Douglas and Ribble and help river water quality by absorbing any nitrogen run off from the sheep grazing on the higher land.

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Harvest Wreath Success!

First prize at the Hesketh Bank Village Show for my ‘Harvest Circle’ creation. I’ve never done any flower arranging before but I couldn’t miss out on the chance to include logs, pumpkins and wreaths so very pleased with coming first!

'Harvest Ring' on a log slice base
‘Harvest Ring’ on a log slice base

Slices of our home grown Silver Birch made up  the base with a simple squash centrepiece with a pine cone, barley, cotoneaster and ivy decorations.

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Cutting Silver Birch Display Logs

The dreadful weather this morning put paid to any outside jobs which was bad news for the pumpkins but good news for one of our local florists. She has been patiently waiting for a selection of premium Silver Birch ‘display’ logs to use in wedding features and flower arrangements.

Silver Birch Logs For Wedding Feature
Silver Birch Logs For a Wedding Feature

I’ve cut many more than she will probably need to allow her a good choice. Any rejected will probably end up as blanks for the kids to paint up as log Santa’s or table numbers for restaurants or weddings.

 

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Beech Logs and Chunks back in stock

It has been a while but beech is back in stock. Some will end up being sold amongst the mixed hardwood firewood but the bulk of this tree will be used for serving boards & platters, logs and heartwood wood chunks for smoking food and walking stick handles.

Rings from a freshly felled Beech tree
Rings from a freshly felled Beech tree

The bulk of the branches have been processed into branch wood chunks for use on BBQ’s and smokers but we have kept a few of the more interesting naturally formed branches for our stick making friends.

Naturally curved beech branches
Naturally curved beech branches

More info: Wood Chunks: www.WoodChunks.co.uk
More info: Walking sticks, staffs, handles and blanks: www.Woodlandcraftshop.co.uk

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Event Props: Achtung Minen Sign

A request for a wooden Achtung Minen sign for use as a prop at an event is not an every day request but I have learnt it never to be wise to be asking too many questions.

Wooden 'Achtung Minen' sign
Wooden ‘Achtung Minen’ sign

Whilst waiting for it to be collected it has been pressed into active service sending a not so guarded message to our errant local dog walkers. We’ll see if it makes any difference.

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