Growing Firewood – 2017 Update

Our annual update on the progress of our firewood growing trials. All have made very good progress but the Eucalyptus seems to be doing the best at the year 3 point. The hybrid willow would normally be harvested now and it is a perfect size for making wood chunks.

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Tree Planting at Banks, West Lancashire

Damon and Matt have been out in all weathers since November but 5000 trees later, the 11 acre field is now planted.

Tree planting at Banks, West Lancashire
Tree planting at Banks, West Lancashire

The trees planted are mixed species of varieties that can be coppiced and will eventually be cropped for timber for crafts or wood fuel . The first cuttings will probably be in 10 – 15 years and every 5 – 7 years thereafter.

Apart from providing fantastic habitat over what was previously monocrop arable farmland, the trees dramatically reduce surface water run-off which in turn reduces the volume and rate that rainwater reaches the struggling pumping stations that this area is so dependent on to alleviate flooding.

Coppicing Hazel
Coppicing Hazel

Also, trees sequester carbon, helping to remove carbon dioxide from the air and as the coppicing program we employ is selective rather than ‘clear fell’ this provides an ongoing benefit with the fuel produced being as close to carbon neutral as we can possibly get.

Lastly, the coppice provides the materials for many ancient woodland crafts. It will be some time before this plantation is ready but expect a few bodging, turning, carving and hurdle making courses to be on the cards in a few years.

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Planting Peppers Early

At the end of the last season, a friend kindly posted to us a few seeds from a giant pepper with a view of us having a go at growing a big one. He advised us to get them planted early January  which seems incredibly early but he is the expert so today half of them got planted along with a selection of our usual chilli and sweet pepper varieties. I will plant the rest towards end March as per normal and compare the results.

Planting Chilli peppers, sweet peppers and giant peppers
Planting Chilli peppers, sweet peppers and giant peppers

The consensus on germination temperatures for peppers seems to be 80-85 degrees F so the propagator has been set to 28 degrees C.

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Frosty mornings on the farm

This week has seen some lovely crisp frosty mornings which is always a beautiful sight and is a real pleasure to walk around the farm.

Frosty Willow
Frosty Willow

Our willow trials continue with a mix of biomass hybrids and traditional basket making varieties planted. The photo above is of some one year old willow whips which are ideal for living willow sculptures or making new plants.

Frosty Hazel
Frosty Hazel

Selected pieces will be harvested from the Hazel coppice over the winter months, mainly for sticks to make walking stick and beating stick shanks  but also to make wood chunks for food smoking which gives the wood smoke a slightly nutty flavour.

Frosty eucalyptus
Frosty eucalyptus

We also grow some Eucalyptus, mainly to harvest for the floristry trade and making essential oils but we are also trailing some hardy snow gum varieties for firewood production. To date the results have been very impressive.

Frosty Holly
Frosty Holly

Our hedges of Holly have been pruned hard in recent weeks for wreath making but the frost makes them quite a picture.

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Coppicing Hazel

As the seasonal wreath making draws to a close a lovely morning allowed a chance to make a start on the Hazel coppice.

Coppicing Hazel
Coppicing Hazel

Our stand of hazel was planted specifically to provide a harvest of walking stick blanks for the surprisingly large number of local stick making enthusiasts. We now use the remaining wood for crafts including wood turning and gypsy flowers, wood chunks for smoking foods and, as a last resort, firewood.

Hazel walking stick shanks
Hazel walking stick shanks

We choose not to ‘clear fell’ the hazel but prefer to selectively cut out the sticks we want and leave the remainder to mature. This practice not only maintains the fantastic wildlife habitat that has been established but it  seems to ‘draw’ some good straight sticks as they fight for the light at the top of the canopy.

 

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Fresh wreath making has started!

The first lorry load of Spruce has arrived from Scotland and production of our orders is underway.

The first 2016 order is now complete; 30 spruce wreaths and 250 grave pots for a customer in Bolton. One down…. many more to go.

Decorated spruce grave pots
Decorated spruce grave pots

We only start Holly wreaths 1st December so at least we have a couple of weeks before having to work in welding gloves!

More information on our fresh wreaths can be found on www.Christmas-Wreath.co.uk

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Display of red mushrooms with white spots heralds Autumn

The annual arrival of our red mushrooms with white spots heralds the onset of Autumn. I did buy a book to identify safe mushrooms to eat but, having read it, decided against it as being ‘almost certain’ just isn’t good enough.

However, in this instance being ‘nearly sure’ IS good enough; I am almost certain that these are Amanita Muscaria which are classified as deadly.

Our red mushrooms with white spots heralds Autumn
Our red mushrooms with white spots heralds Autumn

I think of these as the classic fairy toadstool and a welcomed arrival to the woodland floor. The source of the image of fairies dancing around them might not be that far fetched as, apparently, they have psychedelic properties “if prepared properly”.

Amanita Muscaria: Red mushrooms with white spots
Amanita Muscaria: Red mushrooms with white spots

“Preparing properly” hmmm. A quick search uncovers a range of drying techniques for varying times whilst held at various angles.  Perhaps the best one was the ancient shaman preparation of letting reindeer eat them and then drink their pee.

I think I’ll stick to beer.

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Painting Baby Pumpkins

I don’t suppose many people will actually need a tutorial in how to paint a pumpkin for Halloween but it might be of interest to see the finish achieved using Annie Sloan Chalk paint. The little pumpkins are available from our pumpkin farm shop www.BigPumpkins.co.uk

Select a nice baby pumpkin for painting
Select a nice baby pumpkin for painting

I selected the Annie Sloan ‘Graphite’ chalk paint as I wanted a dark, soft, velvet finish.

A tin of Annie Sloan Graphite Chalk Paint
A tin of Annie Sloan Graphite Chalk Paint

The difference between wet and dry is significant so don’t be disheartened by the gloss of the paint when wet.

Painting baby pumpkins for Halloween
Painting baby pumpkins with Chalk Paint

The dried paint was exactly the texture I had imagined but perhaps a bit lighter than I had hoped for.

A baby pumpkin with one coat of Chalk Paint
A baby pumpkin with one coat of Chalk Paint

One coat was probably not enough but the effect was close to what I had been seeking. Perhaps I will try another with some blackboard paint…

 

 

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Harvesting Mini Pumpkins

The 2016 season mini pumpkins are now available.

They make perfect autumnal table decorations for restaurants, events and weddings either as they are (they are very tactile) or can be used hollowed out as tea light candle holders. We have even sold them for use as soup bowls.

Tiny pumpkins for table decorations
Tiny pumpkins for table decorations

We are harvesting them to order at the moment at just £1 each.

Our making a table tea light tutorial can be found here

For more information please visit or website www.bigpumpkins.co.uk

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